Campaign Updates

Hundreds of flood defences in need of repair after December’s storms

The Environment Agency has identified around 660 flood defences needing repair work In the wake of the December storms.

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In the wake of the December storms, the Environment Agency has carried out 16,000 inspections and identified around 660 flood defences needing repair work.

Some flood defences are still underwater but will be inspected when levels subside, the Agency said.

The on-going work to assess and repair the damage was outlined at an open board meeting on Tuesday 2nd February.

Some high priority defences, including flood banks at Croston and St Michaels in Lancashire, have already been repaired permanently or on a temporary basis.

Acting chairwoman Emma Howard Boyd said:

"Our teams have worked tirelessly to repair flood defences and help communities in particular across Cumbria, Lancashire and Yorkshire get back on their feet after the terrible flooding we saw over December and January.

"Last week I visited Croston in Lancashire and saw the fantastic work that had been done to repair the flood bank and restore protection to residents in the village.

"This is the crucial work we are now focusing on to restore protection to those homes and businesses at risk."

Sir James Bevan, chief executive of the Environment Agency, said:

"Vital flood recovery work is under way across the north of England as Environment Agency teams work to identify repairs and restore protection to communities.

"We will be using the £40 million provided to us by the Government to carry out these vital repairs.

"We will also continue to work with the Government on its flood resilience review, which will assess how we can be better protected in future from the type of extreme weather we saw in December."

Mark Shepherd, General Insurance Manager at the Association of British Insurers (ABI), said:

"The nation's flood defences provide vital protection to many thousands of properties across the UK, but December's storms remind us how many communities remain at high risk. It is clear much more needs to be done.

“It's crucial not only that there is adequate investment in new flood defences but, just as importantly, funding must be available to maintain and repair both new and existing defences. This will give reassurance to the communities they protect, and to the insurance industry, that the defences will do the job they are intended to do when the water levels rise."

Blog: Why the climate summit in Paris matters to British homeowners

Oliver Todd, Emerging Risks Policy Adviser at the Association of British Insurers (ABI), discusses the importance of the the UN's climate change summit, COP21, being held in Paris this week.

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Oliver Todd, ABIOn Monday the UN's climate change summit, COP21, began in Paris. The summit marks what is widely viewed as the last major opportunity for the countries of the world to agree a binding climate deal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and set the planet on a low-carbon trajectory for the future.

Following a failed summit in 2009 in Copenhagen, all the indications in advance of Paris are positive, with 190 countries having submitted carbon pledges and plans to begin reducing their emissions and switch to renewable power sources from 2020.There are, of course, many challenges that face the negotiators over the next 10 days, but the hope remains that this time a deal will be agreed.

Flooding is one of the devastating results of climate change. Over half of the world’s population live within 60km of a coastline or river and regions such as the Mekong delta are already experiencing the impact of climate change on flood risk. The Mekong Delta supplies 20% of the world’s rice crop and is a major population centre, but a 26cm sea level rise projected by the UN to hit by 2050 will greatly increase flood risk with some estimates suggesting a corresponding 15 - 25% decline in rice yields.

The impact of rising water levels needs to be high on the global agenda but, as too many communities in the UK are already aware, it must also be a local priority for the UK. This is why success in Paris is so crucial to the Flood Free Homes Campaign.

Climate change is leading to an environment in which extreme weather events are increasingly unpredictable, frequent and severe. In the UK, five of the top six wettest years on record have happened since 2000 and rainfall events which would have previously occurred, on average, only once in a century are now likely to happen once every eighty years. Today in the UK, two million homes are at risk of coastal or river flooding with an additional 2.4 million at risk of surface water flooding.

By limiting global temperature rise to 2ᵒC the likelihood of extreme weather and flooding can be managed in the long term. Of course, managing increased flood risk cannot only be addressed by tackling climate change and it remains vital that we continue to build and maintain flood defences amongst other initiatives. But by combining action to mitigate climate change, and adaptation through flood defences and a resilient planning system, it is more than possible that the UK can move towards an environment in which our flood risk is managed sustainably for the long term.

Of course the Paris summit is about much more than flood risk; it is about air pollution, desertification, acid rain, sea level rise, habitat loss and a host of other climate change related effects. A deal at Paris has the capacity to transform the future of how we impact our planet, and in turn how our planet will impact on us.

Oliver Todd is Emerging Risks Policy Adviser at the ABI.

Spending Review 2015: Maintenance for flood defences needs to be protected from short-sighted cuts

Spending Review 2015: Maintenance for flood defences needs to be protected from short-sighted cuts

Mark Shepherd, Manager, General Insurance, Association of British Insurers.

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We can expect to hear lots of talk about difficult decisions ahead of the Spending Review on November 25, when the Chancellor will announce his plans for the use of public money over the course of this Parliament.

George Osborne has indicated capital expenditure at Defra is safe from cuts. In a statement provided to the ABI earlier this month, Floods Minister Rory Stewart commented, "Flooding can devastate lives, homes and businesses. That’s why we are investing in flood protection at record levels, with an unprecedented six-year commitment of £2.3 billion to better protect an additional 300,000 homes by 2021." The ABI welcomes this confirmation of funding, that we fought hard to secure and which will protect homes and businesses, and save money in the long run.

However, with DEFRA’s resource budget set to be cut by 30% over the next four years, sadly there remains doubt about an equally vital area of spending – that of flood defence maintenance.

Building a brand new house should provide shelter for decades to come, but that only holds true if you also invest the necessary time and money in keeping the walls and roof in a good state of repair. The same applies to this nation’s flood defences. Spending millions on new defences is only part of the job. Neglect the vital maintenance to keep our flood defences in the right condition and that valuable investment is left in danger of crumbling at just the time it is needed the most.

The Environment Agency’s annual regional revenue maintenance budget for 2010-11 was just over £100 million but this spending was reduced to £60.7 million in 2014-15, which is approximately a 40% cut. Flood defence maintenance needs to be considered alongside investment in building defences to prevent the deterioration of new and existing defences. At a time when the impact of climate change is growing and nation’s flood risk is increasing, it is short-sighted to cut back on the funding which keeps the defences we have, and are set to build, in good working order.

In the wake of the 2013/14 winter floods, there was not only a financial price to pay. Memories of the damage done to communities up and down the UK should still be fresh in the minds of those in Whitehall who are looking at what savings the country can afford to make. As the families who had to spend months out of their wrecked homes, and the thousands of home owners who rely on flood defences to keep them safe, would tell them – cuts to flood defence maintenance are not affordable.

Mark Shepherd is Manager, General Insurance at the Association of British Insurers.

Blog: Better investment will help all of us, and the wildlife around us

Blog: Better investment will help all of us, and the wildlife around us

Jack Rhodes, Water Policy Officer, RSPB

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The RSPB is pleased to support the campaign for Flood Free Homes. Its goals – greater investment in flood defence, better planning and a halt to inappropriate development – will help protect our wildlife as well as our homes.

Many RSPB reserves are flood defences, protecting hundreds of homes, and natural areas have a vital role to play in slowing, storing and absorbing water. Damage to our landscape – from inappropriate development, poor agriculture and pollution – chips away both flood protection and wildlife. Many of us could be more secure if we invested in defences such as coastal saltmarshes, natural drainage systems and wetlands that store floodwater - as well as in the concrete and steel defences needed in many parts of the country.

Flood risk management matters for wildlife as well as people. As the climate gets stormier, looking after ourselves and our wildlife will become more difficult. This inevitably means more investment but it also means better planning; working with local residents on sensible plans that meet their needs at a price they and wider society can afford. Otherwise we’ll always just be reacting to events.

It says a lot that the Flood Free Homes campaign is supported by such a wide range of organisations and people: the insurance industry, social charities, environmental bodies and community groups. It calls for important and sensible steps that are needed to protect nature as well as people, and we hope that it makes a lasting impact on the way people are protected from flooding. The shock of a flooded home, the years that it takes to recover and the health problems faced by flooded families show that flood protection is not just another infrastructure decision – it should be as carefully planned and funded as the National Health Service.

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Sir Edward Garnier, Member of Parliament for Harborough, Oadby and Wigston is supporting the Flood Free Homes campaign. Read more on his website.

Andrew Brown, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Skipton and Ripon, on why he supports for the Flood Free Homes campaign:

"Climate change is causing increasing risk of flooding and I believe it is critical that we not only invest in lower energy consumption but provide support for those who for no fault of their own find themselves at risk of flooding."

Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Suffolk Costal Russell Whiting is supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes. Read more on his website.

Cllr Gerald Vernon Jackson, Leader of Portsmouth City Council and Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Portsmouth South on why he is supporting the campaign:

“I would be happy to support this campaign, as Portsmouth is a coastal city with parts of it below high water mark. Coastal protection is therefore very important to us.”

Blog: Tackling flood risk now for future generations

Last winter, the misery and devastation suffered by many flooded business and home owners starkly highlighted the need to improve flood defences to better protect properties for the future.

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Climate change projections show that flood risk will increase markedly, meaning that more needs to be done now to have the right level of investment in flood defences for the future. The Thames Barrier, for example, was closed 28 times last February- more times in one month than the previous record (24) for a whole winter in 2000-01. Not only will the defences that already exist need to be upgraded, but new defences also need to be built to protect the 2.4 million properties that are currently at flood risk from rivers and the sea, and the 3 million at risk from surface water flooding.

This is why the ABI launched our Flood Free Homes campaign last month, supported by Friends of the Earth, National Flood Forum, Know Your Flood Risk, the Property Care Association’s Flood Protection Group and the BRE Centre for Resilience. The campaign is calling for £1billion per year to be spent by Government on managing flood risk in order to keep pace with climate change and increasing population density.

Is this something we are prepared to let future generations live with or should more be done now to tackle the problem?

By 2025 £1bn per year to be spent on managing flood risk to keep pace with climate change.

In December 2014 the Government announced a six-year spending programme of £2.3 billion of capital Flood Defence Grant in Aid, which aims to protect an additional 300,000 homes through building 1400 new defences. This is very much welcomed, however, it is based on the assumption that external partnership funding will be found for each flood defence to meet the Government’s criteria to enable the new schemes to use capital funds. Additionally there is a need to continue to provide routine maintenance to ensure that defences remain at the standard of protection for which they were designed. Revenue expenditure has been reduced by 40% in recent years, and needs to be considered alongside capital investment to prevent the deterioration of old and new defences.

The Environment Agency’s recently published Long Term Investment Scenarios (LTIS) highlights the Government’s economic assessment of the future need for investment to keep up with climate change. However, investment is focused on a benefit-cost ratio, and does not target those properties at the highest flood risk. The result is that even if all the schemes that are cost-beneficial are delivered, the number of properties at high flood risk will increase to over 250,000 by 2060, with no future plans for their protection. Is this something we are prepared to let future generations live with or should more be done now to tackle the problem?

A zero tolerance of inappropriate new developments in areas at risk of flooding.

LTIS also assumes that there will be a zero tolerance to inappropriate development in areas at flood risk, so the problem could increase further if this is not adhered to. Over 4000 properties per year are being built at high flood risk, and only last month it was reported that 433 new homes are due to be built in an area of Berkshire that was submerged during the winter storms last year.

This is unacceptable. Planning rules must be properly applied by local and regional planning authorities to all developments – irrespective of how large or small – to end inappropriate new developments in areas at risk of flooding and to ensure that new developments do not directly or indirectly increase the flood risk of other properties.

Cross- party consensus on ambitious long term solutions that manage all types of flood risk.

Alongside these concerns about development, there is the need for a long-term, cross-party, coordinated approach by Government, to use innovative solutions to manage flood risk for the future through urban planning, sustainable drainage, building regulations, and land and water management.

The problem is stark and needs to be tackled with ambition. It might be useful to look at the way that the Netherlands manage flood risk, and encourage the UK government to change their outlook. The Dutch have over eight million people living below sea level, and invest on the basis of ensuring those lives are not in danger, instead of looking at the economic benefits. Their legislation protects residents to at least a standard of protection of a 1 in 100,000 chance of coastal flooding in any given year risk, and a 1 in 250 chance of flooding from main rivers in any given year. They have also taken a very different, longer-term approach and have adapted climate change into their urban planning system, and banned inappropriate development on the floodplain since 1980s. Perhaps the UK Government should follow in their footsteps.

In the build up to the General Election, we must ensure that there is a cross-party consensus in understanding the increasing risk of flooding in the UK and agreeing major action to reduce it. Flooding is a very real and significant threat, not a political game.

Laura Hughes is Policy Adviser for Property at the Association of British Insurers.

Leading campaigners call for flood defence spending ahead of Budget 2015

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Ahead of the Budget 2015 this Wednesday, the Flood Free Homes campaign is urging the Chancellor and future Governments to think further ahead than quick wins, and to increase spending on flood defences and maintenance. Two million homes in England and Wales are still at flood risk from the rivers and sea. Yet in both cash and real terms flood defence spending has declined since 2010, with a £500m shortfall between current spending on flood defences and what is needed.*

The Flood Free Homes campaign was launched by the Association of British Insurers, supported by Friends of the Earth, Know Your Flood Risk, National Flood Forum, the Property Care Association’s Flood Protection Group and the BRE Centre for Resilience. The aim of the campaign is to raise the issue of long term flood defence investment and land and water management. The Budget needs to set the tone for future Spending Reviews to ensure that protection against future flooding is a national priority.

The campaign has been supported by more than 80 MPs and prospective parliamentary candidates who recognise the need to address the UK’s growing flood risk through new and maintained flood defences, sensible planning and long term solutions.

The Flood Free Homes campaign is campaigning for:

  • INVEST. By 2025 £1 billion per year to be spent managing flood risk in order to keep pace with climate change.
  • ADAPT. A zero tolerance of inappropriate new developments in areas at risk of flooding.
  • PLAN. Cross party consensus on ambitious long term solutions that manage all types of flood risk.

Flooding has long been recognised as the greatest natural threat the UK faces. Environment Agency data shows around 2 million homes in England and Wales at flood risk now from the rivers and sea, with over 500,000 of these at ‘moderate’ risk or greater, and around 2.4 million additional homes at risk of surface water flooding, this is a serious problem facing the country today.

Without action to reduce the risk across the UK, the effect on our homes, businesses, communities, infrastructure and way of life is potentially devastating.

Louise Hanson, Director of Advocacy at the ABI, said:

“The UK’s increasing flood risk must be a national priority if we are to protect our communities who live in constant fear of flooding. It is vital that we have political consensus on how we manage our land and water in order to have the ambitious long-term solutions we need to effectively manage flood risk. We need a co-ordinated approach to flood defence investment, much more than just ad hoc one-off payments.”

Mary Dhonau, Chair of the Flood Protection Group Property Care Association and Chief Executive of the Know Your Flood Risk Campaign, said:

“Having been flooded myself, I know only too well how devastating it can be! It is essential that spending on flood risk and climate change is prioritised by the next Government. Our infrastructure is woefully inadequate and needs urgent investment to make it fit for purpose for both now and in the future!”

Guy Shrubsole, Friends of the Earth climate campaigner, said:

“The Government’s flood protection plans remain full of holes – investment lags far behind what is needed to keep pace with climate change and there’s still no sign of fresh money for flood defence maintenance. With global warming making our weather more extreme, the Chancellor must use his final budget of this Parliament to get tough on flooding and tough on the causes of flooding.”

Paul Cobbing, Chief Executive of the National Flood Forum, said:

“Flooding affects the very heart of peoples’ lives and causes untold trauma and suffering to individuals and communities. With flood risk and the impacts of flooding expected to increase, its important now more than ever to invest in managing our flood risk for the future. With an 8:1 economic benefit ratio new schemes also make sense, whilst maintenance makes sure that we reap the benefits of our investment.”

Stephen Garvin, Director BRE Centre for Resilience, said:

“We are supporting campaign for Flood Free Homes. It is important that new developments are constructed responsibly and in appropriate locations. The campaign will encourage investment in flood defences, and promote greater uptake of measures at community and property level to improve resilience and reduce the cost of repairing damage after flood events. Therefore, we encourage government and industry to invest in appropriate research to encourage greater action in this area.”

How to get involved and find out more information:

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Sir Oliver Heald QC MP, Member of Parliament for North East Hertfordshire, is supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes – read more in the Herts and Essex Observer

Member of Parliament for Knowlsey, Rt Hon George Howard MP, is supporting the campaign. Find out more on his website.

Cllr James Abbott, Prospective Parliamentary candidate for Witham, tells us why he is supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes:

"I support the campaign – as a Councillor I have seen planning permission being given for building in flood areas too many times (despite me trying to prevent it). Climate change will bring more flooding – as a Green Party candidate I am fully behind urgent action to tackle climate change and to protect homes and businesses from future flooding."

Read why Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Hinckley and Bosworth, Cllr Michael Mullaney, supports the Flood Free Homes campaign here.

Caroline Stephens, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Stroud explains why she is supporting the campaign here.

 

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Read about the support of Bath and North East Somerset Council for the Flood Free Homes campaign in NOW Bath:
Link here

Louise Hanson, Director of Advocacy at the ABI, writes in the Yorkshire Post this week about the need to act now to prevent future flooding, as part of the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Paul Cobbing, Chief Executive of the National Flood Forum, tells us why he is behind the campaign for Flood Free Homes:
Link here

Blog: We must act now before flooding gets worse

We still have a very long way to go.

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Flood water can drag the heart out of communities.  Once the water, the politicians and the cameras are gone, people have a long hard grind to get their lives back to normal and the trauma can live with people for the rest of their lives. This is why we must get better at managing flood risk to protect our communities. Flooding should be a priority for all of national and local government, both to fund and maintain defences, but also to ensure that this money is not wasted through poor development, lack of maintenance of gullies, culverts and bridges, and inadequate riparian management.

We still have a very long way to go.

Managing flood risk using the full range of tools from catchment management to flood defences, and reducing the impact on individual homes is essential to protect people against the effects on flooding. Though, as the recent report on Defra performance from the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee highlighted, the low level of funding for flood risk management, particularly maintenance, is concerning  for the millions of homes at risk of flooding. A much longer-term, more coherent, better co-ordinated approach is desperately needed in this country, that includes all of the factors that affect flood risk.

This is why the National Flood Forum is supporting the Flood Free Homes campaign, for a sensible long term approach to land and water management. We must act now, as climate change and factors such as development and higher population density mean that the problem is getting worse. We need sustained and co-ordinated investment in building and maintaining flood defences, a sensible approach to building new sustainable housing and long-term thinking about flood prevention that does not get caught up in the politics.

Flooding throughout the world is becoming more extreme as a result of changing weather patterns and increasing populations.  Here in the UK we’ve had more severe floods in the last ten years than in the generation before.  Flooding can hit anywhere now – not just near the major rivers.

The devastating nationwide floods in 2007 created the biggest peacetime civil emergency since the Second World War. According to the Pitt Review, 55,000 properties were flooded, with 7,000 people needing to be rescued from flood waters and 13 people died. Recently, the annual cost of flood damage has been £1.1 billion and is set to rise.

At the National Flood Forum, we work with communities at risk of flooding to offer advice and support them when preparing for flooding and starting the recovery process if the worst has happened. We see first-hand how communities can be devastated by flood water and how challenging the recovery can be. We hope in the future that this country will be more resilient and protected against floods, so that fewer of our communities experience this first hand.

Paul Cobbing is Chief Executive of the National Flood Forum.

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Ben Howlett, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Bath, tells us why he supports the Flood Free Homes campaign:

“I am supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes which calls for effective management of our land and water that includes the areas surrounding the River Avon. I know the devastating historical impact that flooding has had on Bath residents and I want to make sure that homeowners and local businesses do not suffer from destructive floods in the future. We need ambitious long term solutions to ensure that our communities are protected.”

Councillor Bob Price, Leader, Oxford City Council, explains why Oxford City Council supports the campaign:

“At Oxford City Council we know only too well the misery, inconvenience and appalling impact on the local economy caused by flooding. We have and will continue to press the Government for better funding so residents and businesses are better protected.”

Kevin Barron, Member of Parliament for Rother Valley, shows his support for the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Leslie Rowe, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Richmond, tells us why she supports the Flood Free Homes campaign:

“I live in an old house next to a river, so I can see for myself the flood risks of new developments in my own home village near Richmond. So I agree that by 2025 £1bn per year should be spent on managing flood risk and that there should be no inappropriate new developments in flood risk areas.”

Elizabeth Adams, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Stratford upon Avon, is supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes:

“The slogan Invest, Adapt and Plan is appropriate and we would especially appreciate attention being paid to a zero tolerance approach to development in areas at risk of flooding, and more awareness of the increasing vigilance required to ensure that by 2025 no home is at risk of flooding. Not only is investment required to prevent river flooding, more attention is required to the drains and sewage systems.”

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Ian Middleton, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Banbury, tells us why he supports the Flood Free Homes campaign:

 

“News pictures of people whose homes have been repeatedly destroyed through floods are a frequent source of dismay.  We must take flooding and the causes of flooding much more seriously.  As we witness climate change on a global scale and poor control of new building and land management on a local level, the risk continues to increase.  Only by tackling all the root causes will we be able to give everyone in risk areas some peace of mind.”

Rt Hon George Howarth, Member of Parliament for Knowsley, is supporting the Flood Free Homes campaign:

“As a result of global climate change, flood risk is the number one environmental risk that the UK faces today. The impact of flooding can be devastating and it is essential that MPs work together with experts and local communities to ensure that no home is at high risk of flooding by 2025.”

Rt Hon Caroline Spelman, Member of Parliament for Meriden and former Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, is supporting the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

 

Roger Williams, Member of Parliament for Brecon and Radnorshire, explains why he is supporting the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Gisela Stuart, Member of Parliament for Birmingham and Edgbaston shows her support for the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness, Graham Stuart, gets behind the campaign for Flood Free Homes:
Link here

Paul Brannen, MEP for the North East, tells us why he supports the campaign for Flood Free Homes:
I support the campaign for Flood Free Homes. As a member of the European Parliament's Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development I have been campaigning for smart afforestation and for improvements to existing woodland, which would increase the water retention capacity of soil and so prevent flooding in hard-hit areas.

Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Redcar, Josh Mason, tells Zetland FM why he is supporting the campaign for Flood Free Homes:
Link here

Gordon Peters, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Honsey and Wood Green tells us why he supports the campaign:
We need much stronger environment protection and homes protection in balance with each other, and a stop to over-development on food plains.

Karl McCartney, Member of Parliament for Lincoln, has pledged to support the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Flood Free Homes in the news

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Anne McIntosh, Member of Parliament for Thirsk and Malton and Chair of the Environment,Food and Rural Affairs Committee tells the Gazette and Herald why she supports the campaign for Flood Free Homes:
Link here

Jon Wheale, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Burton explains why he supports the campaign’s goals of increased expenditure on flood defences and cross-party support for long-term plans to manage flood risk:
Link here

Mark Williams, Member of Parliament for Ceredigion in the Tivyside Advertiser confirming his support for the Flood Free Homes campaign:
Link here

Ginnie Shaw, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for York Outer tells us why she supports the campaign:
“I support the campaign for Flood Free Homes because I recognise the importance of investing in flood prevention to mitigate the effects of climate change, acknowledge the risks posed by inappropriate development in areas at risk of flooding and  uphold the need to achieve cross-party consensus on ambitious long-term solutions that manage all types of flood risk. “

Stuart Adair, Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Tewkesbury, discussing his support for the Flood Free Homes campaign in the Gloucestershire Echo:
Link here

One week on from the launch of Flood Free Homes campaign - 20 MPs sign up representing 1.4 million constituents

Only one week after launching, 20 MPs representing 1.4 million constituents have already signed up in support of the Flood Free Homes Campaign. In addition, 26 Prospective Parliamentary Candidates have also pledged their support.

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On Tuesday 20 January 2015, the Flood Free Homes campaign was launched by the Association of British Insurers, supported by  the Friends of the Earth, Know Your Flood Risk, the National Flood Forum and the Property Care Association’s Flood Protection Group. The campaign has seen significant cross-party support from parliamentary stakeholders who recognise the need to reduce the risk of flooding across the UK.

The campaign is calling for:

                                    
  • By 2025 £1bn per year to be spent on managing flood risk to keep pace with climate change.
  • A zero tolerance of inappropriate new developments in areas at risk of flooding.
  • Cross-party consensus on ambitious long term solutions that manage all types of flood risk.

Louise Hanson, Director of Advocacy at the Association of British Insurers said:

“We’re delighted that this campaign is already receiving significant support as it is vital that we have consensus on how we manage our land and water in order to create ambitious long-term solutions that effectively manage flood risk.”

MPs and PPCs who have pledged their support to the campaign supporters so far include:

MPs

Andrew Percy MP, Brigg and Goole
Martin Vickers MP, Cleethorpes
Anne McIntosh MP, Thirsk and Malton
Bill Wiggin MP, North Hereforshire
David Amess MP, Southend West
Diana Johnson MP, Hull North
Gisela Stuart MP, Birmingham Edgbaston
Ian Swales MP, Redcar
John Pugh MP,  Southport
Karl McCartney MP, Lincoln
Mark Simmonds MP, Boston and Skegness
Mark Williams MP, Ceredigion
Neil Carmichael MP, Stroud
Peter Aldous MP , Waveney
Rebecca Harris MP, Castle Point
Richard Graham MP, Gloucester
Robin Walker MP, Worcester
Roger Williams MP, Brecon and Radnorshire
Sheryll Murray MP, South East Cornwall
Stephen Gilbert MP, St Austell and Newquay

Prospective Parliamentary Candidates (PPCs)

Alan Hilliar, PPC, Aldershot
Carol Thornton, PPC, Cleethorpes
Claire Jeffrey, PPC, Folkestone and Hythe
David Flint, PPC, Enfield North
Dinah Keal, PPC, Thirsk and Malton
Emily Brothers, PPC, Sutton and Cheam
Fiona Dent, PPC, Windsor
Ginnie Shaw, PPC, York Outer
Gordon Peters, PPC, Hornsey and Wood Green
James Barber, PPC, Dulwich and West Norwood
Jonathan Tyler,  PPC, York Central
Jon Ball, PPC, Ealing Central and Acton
Jon Wheale, PPC, Burton
Josh Mason, PPC, Redcar
Laetitia Glossop, PPC, North Durham
Michael Mullaney , PPC, Bosworth
Nusrat Ghani , PPC, Wealden
Paul Bullen, PPC, Huntingdon
Rebecca Pow, PPC, Taunton Deane
Rob Marris, PPC , Wolverhampton South West
Seema Kennedy, PPC, South Ribble
Stuart Adair, PPC, Tewkesbury
Simon Rix, PPC, Truro and Falmouth
Stephen Worrall, PPC, High Peak
Victoria Atkins, PPC , Louth and Horncastle
Wera Hobhouse, PPC, North East Somerset